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Fluffy Whole Wheat Pancakes


I like pancakes.  But for some reason, I can let years go by without making them.  I’m even worse with waffles.  It’s been probably four years since I made waffles.  I don’t know why!  They are so good and so simple.

Last week I woke up with a hankering for pancakes.  I consider buttermilk pancakes made with white flour the best, but I had no buttermilk and I wanted them to be a little more on the healthy side, so I whipped up a whole wheat batch instead, using coconut sugar (a Christmas gift from Emma H., a sweet reader) in place of regular and raw coconut nectar instead of maple syrup.  I didn’t plan to blog them, figuring they’d be nothing all that special, so I took a bite without taking any pictures first.  And then I died.  Or at least I thought I did, because as soon as I dug in, I was transported to heaven. Pictures ensued.

The pancakes are surprisingly fluffy and light for being whole wheat.  The whole wheat aspect gives them more substance, but doesn’t seem to weigh them down.  I definitely love the flavor whole wheat adds to pancakes.  Slathered with butter and syrup, they are a delicious and wholesome breakfast treat!

Warning: tangent ahead.  If you have no interest in coconut sweeteners, just skip to the recipe and use whatever kind of sweetener in and out of the pancakes you like. :)

If you’ve never tried coconut sweeteners and are curious about them, here’s the deal.  They are low-glycemic sweeteners (35 on the glycemic index, which is comparable to most fruits and veggies) that won’t spike your blood sugar like regular sugar, or even good-for-you honey and maple syrup.  This is good news not only for diabetics, but for everyone, since eating sugary foods can cause a crash that makes you crave more sugar – the vicious sugar cycle.  Coconut sweeteners are unrefined as well, meaning a lot healthier for you than regular sugar!  They both are an abundant source of minerals, amino acids, vitamin-C, broad spectrum B vitamins, and have a nearly neutral PH.

As for the taste, you might be surprised to know that neither come from the coconut fruit itself, or taste anything like coconut!  The sugar is produced from the flower buds of the coconut tree, and the syrup/nectar comes from the tree sap, just like maple syrup is taken from the sap of maple trees.  I think the sugar is similar to brown sugar, and looks like it too, except it doesn’t stick/clump together.  The syrup is similar to molasses, especially when tasted straight, but much milder in flavor.  I didn’t think I’d like it on pancakes because I’m not a huge fan of molasses, but the flavor changed when added to them.  Not molasses at all, just a nice mildly sweet flavor that compliments the pancakes – absolutely fantastic!

Fluffy Whole Wheat Pancakes

Printable recipe
Printable recipe with picture

1 cup (4 oz) whole wheat flour
1 ½ tablespoons sugar (I used coconut sugar)
¾ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
1 egg
1 cup (8 oz) milk
2 tablespoons butter or oil, plus more for skillet (I used coconut oil)

Combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a small bowl. In a separate small bowl, whisk egg and then mix in milk and oil. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and stir until mixed, but not smooth. Let batter rest for five minutes while you preheat the skillet or griddle to 350F. Test if it’s ready by scattering drops of water over it. If they sizzle and dance, it’s ready.

Grease the skillet with a tablespoon of butter or coconut oil, then pour batter onto skillet to make pancakes the size of your choice. Once bubbles are over the surface and the edges are turning dry, flip over and cook until done. Serve warm with butter and syrup (I use raw coconut nectar).

Makes two giant pancakes, or four regular-sized ones.

Recipe source: adapted from Alton Brown’s recipe

You may also enjoy…

Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes (my favorite!)

Brown Sugar Bacon Waffles

Cornmeal Griddle Cakes

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