Advertisements
RSS Feed

Cream Cheese Wedding Frosting & Some Cake Tips

Posted on

These are some of my trade “secrets,” including my recipe for cream cheese wedding cake frosting.  I hope you find some of them useful!

1.  A box mix cake covered in delicious homemade frosting is quicker and easier, and can be just as delicious (or more so) than from-scratch cake. Replace the water and oil with milk and melted butter to give it a richer, more homemade taste.

2.  Make your own frosting.  It is worth the effort and doesn’t take much time.  The flavor is incomparable to canned frosting and even if you use it on an un-enhanced box mix cake, it will still taste from scratch rather than generic.  If you’re looking for a good recipe, I have many favorites in my Cake & Frosting Index.

3.  For cakes that never stick to the pan, no matter how big it is: grease the bottom of your pan, cover it (bottom only) with parchment paper, then grease and flour the whole thing. I use this mostly for bigger pans, but for 12″ and under, Miracle Pan Release works perfectly without the extra steps.

4.  Cool your cake completely before frosting.  Otherwise the frosting will melt off and your efforts will have been for naught.  Another tip on cooling: after baking, allow your cake to sit in the pan for five minutes and then turn it out onto a cooling rack so that the heat releases easier and it cools faster.  Otherwise the cake continues to bake in the pan after it’s out of the oven and dries it out more.  Leaving it in the pan 5 minutes allows it to set a little and reduces the risk of the cake breaking since it’s hot from the oven.

5.  If your cake feels dry to the touch (this happens especially around the edges), use a spray bottle to douse the affected area with water.  I use a bottle designated for water only b/c you don’t want to get residue from a bottle that previously housed cleaner on something you’re going to eat.  This trick works wonderfully and doesn’t affect the taste at all.  Don’t be afraid to put too much water—just squirt until it feels moist and then keep it covered or wrapped until you’re ready to frost it.  The cake will absorb the moisture uniformly so that it’s moist and delicate throughout.  You can also add liqueur to the spray bottle to add a subtle flavor to the cake.  I used chocolate liqueur on a red velvet wedding cake and have also used Kahlua on a chocolate cake and both worked very well.

6.  Here’s another water bottle trick that is invaluable to me.  To make your frosting super-smooth on your cake, use your water bottle to douse the entire cake after you’ve smoothed it out as much as you can.  Your spatula will glide over it easily to give a flawless finish and whatever water remains on the surface will evaporate and no one will be the wiser.  Oh, and you can’t do this without an offset spatula or some sort of long, straight edged tool.

7.  Here’s another secret that you have to either go to the cake store for or buy online.  You know that flavor that’s in the white frosting of every wedding cake you’ve ever had?  Have you ever tried to duplicate it?  You can’t find it in any Betty Crocker frosting and you will probably never be able to make it at home without crème bouquet.

It is a divine flavor emulsion that gives that sweet wedding cake taste to your frosting.  You can add it to plain vanilla frosting, but I also add it to my cream cheese frosting for a subtle, wonderful effect.  So there was the wedding cake taste underlying the rich, tangy cream cheese flavor.  Yum!

My Secret Cream Cheese Wedding Frosting

1 stick unsalted butter, room temperature
1 (8-oz) package cream cheese, room temperature
1-2 pounds powdered sugar (less for a creamier frosting, more for thicker)
2 tsp. clear vanilla extract (you can use regular if you don’t mind the color turning a tad darker)
2 tsp. crème bouquet*

Beat the butter and cream cheese until smooth.  Add the remaining ingredients and beat on medium/high.  Use immediately or store at room temp until cake is frosted.  Refrigerate or freeze if you won’t be using it within a few days.  Use the water bottle trick to get it smooth on your cake.

*Crème bouquet is a flavoring, essential to achieving the “wedding cake” flavor.  To find out more about crème bouquet, click here.

8.  If you’re fed up with cakes that dome in the middle, use Bake-Even cake strips.  You wet them with cold water, pin them around the cake pan, and your cake rises evenly and fairly flat. This dramatically reduces the amount you have to cut off the top in order to make it flat for layering and frosting, so less is wasted and you get more cake per serving.  That’s always good. :)

9.  And if you do make cakes enough, you should probably invest in a cake leveler. Unless you’re uniquely gifted, it’s nearly impossible to cut the cake top off in a straight line.  Wilton sells two different sizes of cake levelers (I prefer the large and use it for all my cakes) that makes this a breeze.   You just adjust it to the height you want and saw across the cake (keeping the cutter straight up and down) and you’ll have a perfectly flat cake that will stack gorgeously.

10.  If you won’t be frosting the cake as soon as it’s cool, wrap it well with plastic wrap or seal it in Ziploc bag and press the air out (without squashing the cake).  If it dries out in the slightest, just give it a spray with water or liqueur to restore moisture. You can also freeze your cake (after wrapping it well) and when ready to assemble, take it out of the freezer and frost it while frozen! It actually makes the job easier since the hard cakes are easier to handle and cold cake firms up the frosting as it is applied, which helps when icing a cake.

I hope these tips help you a little with your own cake baking. Please share your own tips in the comments!

Advertisements

About Veronica

I have a kitchen addiction and love to collect & share recipes. My passion is baking but I love to cook as well. The only thing I don't like to do in the kitchen is wash dishes, but my husband generally does them for me in exchange for his dinner.

96 responses »

  1. Pingback: Cake Pops « Recipe Rhapsody

  2. This is seriously such valuable info! thank you so much for sharing these tips!

    Like

    Reply
  3. Thank you so much for your valuable information.
    Can you send me your vanilla frosting recipe
    I would really appreciate it.
    have a good day
    vivian

    Like

    Reply
    • I NEVER make vanilla frosting–can you believe that? If I need a pale frosting, I either make white (it has vanilla in it but I wouldn’t call it vanilla) or cream cheese. Here is Magnolia Bakery’s simple vanilla buttercream recipe, which is what I would use if I made vanilla frosting:

      • 1 cup unsalted butter, very soft
      • 8 cups confectioners’ sugar
      • 1/2 cup milk
      • 2 teaspoons vanilla

      Place the butter in a large mixing bowl. Add 4 cups of the sugar and then the milk and vanilla. Beat until smooth and creamy. Gradually add the remaining sugar, 1 cup at a time, until icing is thick enough to be of good spreading consistency (you may very well not need all of the sugar). If desired, add a few drops of food coloring and mix thoroughly. Use and store icing at room temperature, as icing will set if chilled. Can store in an airtight container for up to three days.

      Like

      Reply
  4. Veronica,

    Does your cream cheese icing recipe need to be refrigerated? Or do you have a recipe for a wedding cake that will hold up in heat, but isn’t sweet? Thanks!

    Like

    Reply
    • To be safe, any frosting that has cream cheese in it should be refrigerated. That being said, I’ve left it out for up to five days without going bad. If you’re making a wedding cake with this frosting up to three days before the wedding, I wouldn’t worry about refrigerating it. Frostings that hold up best in heat have powdered sugar in them (swiss meringues are less sweet but melt faster) and thus they are sweeter. I use a LOT of powdered sugar b/c it is best for decorating (you want a pretty thick icing, esp when icing wedding cakes), but no one has ever complained about it. In fact, this frosting is the one most often requested on my cakes. The tanginess of the cream cheese does help offset the sweetness.

      Like

      Reply
      • I have made a cream cheese frosting similar to this one and it melted in the heat. I had it out on my kitchen cabinet. What am I doing wrong?

        Like

        Reply
        • How much powdered sugar did you use? I use a toooon and it keeps it from melting except in very high heat. Most recipes call for half the amount of sugar I use, or less.

          Like

          Reply
      • Veronica,
        How long does this icing last if kept in the refrigerator? And can you freeze it to use at a later date? Thank you!

        Like

        Reply
        • It will last several weeks in the fridge,and months in the freezer. I freeze leftover frosting often to use later. I recommend storing it in a plastic tub with a piece of plastic wrap over the surface of the icing, covering completely, before you snap the lid into place. it stores really well this way without taking on a freezer taste.

          Like

          Reply
          • Hi Veronica- got another question for you. I saw in another comment that the usual size wedding cake you make is 3 round tiers: 14″, 10″, and 6″. Is that the size that’s in the picture above? How many people does that normally feed?

            I also want to thank you for such a great recipe. I used it on some blue velvet cupcakes I made for a bridal shower and it was perfect!

            Like

            Reply
          • Yes, that’s the size in the picture above and it feeds 100 generously, probably up to 150 with normal wedding-sized slices, or possibly more. I always cut them way too big-lol.

            Like

            Reply
  5. I am trying to find out what I could substitute traditional icing for in cake pops. I find the icing makes the cake pop tooooo sweet…for me anyway. Any suggestions?

    Like

    Reply
  6. In your cream cheese frosting, What is creme bouquet?

    Like

    Reply
    • It is a flavor emulsion and I really can’t describe how it tastes other than “wedding cake.” It has lemon, almond, and vanilla but other things in there not mentioned on the label. It adds such a wonderful flavor! You don’t need it to make the frosting, but if you want it to taste like wedding cake, then you do. You can use your own combination of extracts or just use vanilla too.

      Like

      Reply
  7. hi veronica how long this cream cheese frosting can last without fridge? and what is creme bouquet? :) thanks!

    Like

    Reply
  8. hi there~ what is cream bouquet?

    Like

    Reply
  9. Hi
    Just stumbled on your site and I love it!
    Thx for sharing ur experience!

    Like

    Reply
  10. Ur AWESOME, Veronica

    Like

    Reply
  11. Oh God love ya! Thanks for these tips! Definitely going to buy a cake leveler. And I love your tip to spray the cake with water to make it moist, and to spray the frosting with water too! I’m reading all of your cake series tips!

    Like

    Reply
  12. Nancy Ringer

    Miss Veronica, On your cream cheese wedding cake frosting, how much does the recipe make. I’m making a square 4 tiered wedding cake 12′- 10″ – 8″ and 6″. Wondering how many batches I’ll need to make. PS Thanks for the Awesome useful info and tips!

    Like

    Reply
    • Good question, I really need to measure it next time. In my notes, I wrote that I use 7 batches for the usual size of wedding cake I make, which is 3 round tiers: 14″, 10″, and 6″. For yours, you’d probably need a little more but I’d say 7 at least. You can always make more if you run out.

      Like

      Reply
      • Thank you so much. Hope you have a good staycation. I live in TN but my family all live in salina\ Minneapolis/ Brokville and Junction City Ks. Miss Kansas!

        Like

        Reply
        • It was wonderful! I’m surprised we found so many things to do! We once went through TN on vacation but all I can remember is our car breaking down and us getting towed. LOL!

          Like

          Reply
  13. I’ve had this bookmarked since it was posted, but I will be getting around to using it soon. I usually use liquid coffee creamer in place of milk in my vanilla frostings. I’m excited to use your recipe. I do have a question; I’m using the wedding frosting for my daughter’s birthday cupcakes, is this an ideal frosting to use in larger tips? Say a 1M or so if I use more powdered sugar? Thanks so much for your time!

    Like

    Reply
    • Interesting you use coffee creamer, that is something I had thought of trying but never did. I thought it might be neat to use the flavored ones, like hazlenut to flavor it. I bet it is good! Yes, this frosting is good in tips, but it is a fairly stiff frosting so if you want it to pipe easier, you can use just 1 lb of sugar instead of 2, or just add as much to get your desired texture. I do it both ways and it will work either way. Hope you love it!

      Like

      Reply
  14. Hi Veronica! Love this site! I have a question for you. I am making my own wedding cupcakes and wanted to do red velvet with a cream cheesing frosting. Does this recipe for cream cheese frosting hold its shape well? Could I do some fancy swirl with it on the cupcakes and it hold and not melt off? My wedding is actually in 2 days! So If I make the cupcakes the day before would they still be ok to sit out, or should I refrigerate them until we are ready to eat them? Ok so maybe I had a few questions :)

    Like

    Reply
    • It holds it’s shape very well and for cupcakes you can use the less amount of sugar (it’s tastier that way, not as sweet) and it will still hold well. That is how I make it for cupcakes. Yes you can do them the day before and leave them at room temperature. They will be OK for at least 2 days but definitely one day is OK. Do not serve them cold or I will never forgive you. Love, the cake Nazi.

      Like

      Reply
  15. Veronica; this was amazing information!!!
    Thanks for sharing your secrets with us :)

    Like

    Reply
  16. Hi just wondering if you can put fondant over the top of the cream cheese frosting? Verity

    Like

    Reply
  17. I’ve been reading a lot of posts about cream cheese frosting causing cakes to slide (I don’t see how it would if you use dowels for support). I am making a wedding cake with this frosting recipe. It is for a warm Miami wedding (though the cake will be indoors, probably 80-85 degrees ) how will my frosting and decorations hold up?

    Like

    Reply
    • I’m so sorry I didn’t see your comment until now! I always use cream cheese frosting for wedding cakes and only once had a problem, but only b/c I cut the dowels too tall and the cake was not stable during transpiration. I can’t imagine any frosting holding up to temperatures that high but have never tested it. I would think the frosting would be very, very soft from the heat, but it just may work.

      Like

      Reply
  18. The cake in this picture is beautiful. Is the piping frosting the same as the base frosting or is it writer? If not, what color is the piping? For the cake I’m making, the bride wants cream cheese frosting but I’m not sure what color the piping should be.

    Like

    Reply
  19. Hello, first off thank you for all this great information! It is so useful. I have a few questions. I’m doing a 2 (10 & 6) tier cake for my baby shower and really want it to have fresh bananas with Nutella and nuts in the layers….I know, I know…I’m just really craving this :-) Do you think the cream cheese frosting will work in between layers and keep filling from seeping out? Or do you think this filling wont work? I’m also craving the fresh strawberries with cream cheese filling so I was thinking of doing the smaller cake with the most difficult filling and the other with the other so I get to try both :-) any tips on using fresh fruits in fillings? I will probably make it the night before and use dowels to be safe. Thank you.

    Like

    Reply
    • Hey that sounds good to me! I’m pregnant right now too so I’d love to eat that as well. :) I love that you’re making your own cakes too b/c I’m making cupcakes for mine. I guess when you love to bake, you can’t be stopped even if it’s for your own shower! :D Anyway, do you mean making a dam with the cream cheese frosting to keep the filling in? That should work as long as the filling isn’t higher than the dam when you put the next cake layer on top. I’ve never used fresh fruit in fillings, though I did top a cake with fresh bananas once. I sprinkled FruitFresh on them to keep them from turning brown (you won’t need this since yours won’t be exposed to the air) and they got really wet from seeping their liquid! Good luck, and send me pictures to drool over if you get the chance! My email is vraklis@yahoo.com :)

      Like

      Reply
  20. Veronica
    I am in need of some help. I am making a 3 teired wedding cake with cream cheese icing in middle to late August (80-90 degree weather). It will be inside, but I would like to make sure that it doesn’t melt. What do I do to ensure that this doesn’t happen? Please Help! I would hate to let the Bride down. Thank you very much for your time.

    Like

    Reply
  21. I have a similar issue to Angel, any guidance on this for wedding cakes would be of great help, many thanks!

    Like

    Reply
    • Oops, I replied to her via personal message and forgot to copy it here. I only use this recipe for wedding cakes (except for one time) and it’s fine as long as it’s not too hot. The key is making it super thick – you definitely have to use 2 lbs of sugar in the recipe instead of 1 lb. It’s hard to mix but gets softer as you mix it. I use a frosting tip to apply it to the cake since it’s too thick to spread easily, then I smooth it out. If you spray your frosted cake with water, the spatula glides over the surface to make a perfect finish. Refrigerate the iced cake and the water will evaporate overnight, then you can decorate. And don’t worry about it being too thick that it won’t be pleasant to eat – it may seem super thick but it’s nice and creamy when you eat it.

      Like

      Reply
  22. Thank you very much Veronica for the assistance and advice.

    Like

    Reply
  23. Question…can this be converted to chocolate? Say by reducing some of the powdered sugar and adding cocoa powder? I’m doing a large sheet cake that feeds 80 and it was recommended to do three layers which frosting in between. How many batches woudl we need to make? Thank you for posting this!

    Like

    Reply
    • I’m really sorry – for some reason I didn’t see your comment until now! Yes it can be converted but would just take some experimentation on your part. I would add 1/2 a cup cocoa powder and half the sugar, taste, and add more to your taste. If it gets too thick, thin with milk.

      Like

      Reply
  24. Heather Martin

    I am making a wedding cake in October with different layers, one of which is pumpkin! Your cream cheese icing would be lovely for this layer, but I am concerned that it will not match the white icing of the other layers. So long as I use the clear vanilla, would you say that the cream cheese icing is as pure white as other vanilla icing? I could make a sample of each prior to making the cake, but I’d hate for it to go to waste!

    Like

    Reply
    • No it will not be pure white because the color of the butter turns it more of an ivory color. Honestly, if it doesn’t have to be bright white, I’d use this on the entire cake. It’s so much better than white buttercream! If it must be white, then maybe you could just make a very small batch to fill the pumpkin layer with and then use the white on the outside. Another thing you could do is buy some LorAnn cheesecake candy flavoring and use that in your white icing for the pumpkin layer to give it a similar flavor to cream cheese icing. I’ve done that with my white and it’s quite good, even if not AS good.

      Like

      Reply
  25. sylvia shade

    how do u stiffen cream cheese frosting I have a wedding cake in aug.

    Like

    Reply
  26. Hi there. I’m making a 3 tier wedding cake and each tier has 3 cakes. I’ve made your frosting for all of it and it is just outstanding. The creme bouquet really pushes your frosting up a league. Here’s my question: I’m freezing everything. That way when the flowers go on I’ll bring a little frosting glue to hold them in place, but how long should I plan on it to fully defrost? I was thinking 5 or 6 hours but that might be too long. Thank you-and the water squirt bottle is a great trick.
    Jim

    Like

    Reply
    • Wow Jim that sounds like an impressive cake and I hope you’ll share photos with me! :D So glad you liked the frosting and the water bottle trick. I honestly have no idea how long it would take but unless it will be outside and very warm, I don’t think there is a “too long” for how far in advance you can put it out. It won’t spoil even if at room temp for several days. I think your estimation sounds pretty fair for how long it will take and as long as there’s no concern about the heat melting it, I’d take it out as early as possible to make sure it’s not frozen or even cold in the middle. Room temperature cake is so much better. :)

      Like

      Reply
      • Well, all went pretty good. The cake was out of this world, and I think this is a picture that belongs in a book somewhere. The cake was frozen and taken out of the freezer at 3:00 PM. By the time we cut the cake at 8:30-5 1/2 hours later, the cake was thawed on the outside, but cold. It was still exceptional. Flavorful, and moist. When I started to cut the area of the cake where the top sat on(top cake removed for anniversary), the middle portion was still hard enough that I couldn’t cut through it. So, I had to start cutting the outside of the bottom layer, and that was okay. I think it probably could have used a good 3 more hours at room temperature. But it was outstanding as far as taste.

        Like

        Reply
        • So happy to hear that it was mostly OK despite being cold and a part still frozen. Can you send a picture or pictures to my email? vraklis@yahoo.com. Or if you have them on Google+ or photobucket or set to public on Facebook, you could just share the link to them.

          Like

          Reply
  27. I do have pictures but no way to upload them to you

    Like

    Reply
  28. Thank you for this recipe! I am making my friends wedding cake and she originally wanted whipped icing. I thankfully talked her out of it. Does this recipe do well for making flowers and such?

    Like

    Reply
  29. hey! im thinking of baking a 3-tiered wedding cake(two layers each and sizes 12″, 9″ and 6″) and i was thinking of a red velvet, a lemon and a fruit cake(?-cant seem to get to a decision for that top layer) for the layers. i want cream cheese frosting to cover the cake and as filling between the layers too. i was wondering if it’ll work (taste wise and stability wise). and how many batches of the frosting will i need ?
    any other tips welcome!
    thanks!

    Like

    Reply
    • Yum, I think cream cheese frosting would taste great with all those flavors! I only use this frosting for wedding cakes and it works great for me, using 2 lbs of sugar per batch for a stiffer frosting. The cakes I made were 14″, 10″, and 6″ and for those, I would make 7 batches. For yours, you might need 5 or 6 maybe? I don’t know for sure – I kind of always guessed and it’s OK to end up with extra b/c you can use it for decorations or freeze it for later use.

      Like

      Reply
  30. Pingback: wedding bouquet emulsion - orciled.com

  31. Hi Veronica! We all love cream cheese frosting and I didn’t know you could add more powdered sugar!! Super! My daughter wants a “naked” cake for her wedding, basically frosting between the layers & on top. With fruit or flowers to adorn it. I am thinking that that will be one dry cake! She is thinking of carrot cake thou. And I am wondering if the spray bottle trick would help. Any thoughts? Thank you

    Like

    Reply
  32. Jennifer White

    Hi, thank you so much for your tips, I would be going crazy without them! This is my first wedding cake in a few more months… and it’s for family, wish me luck!
    I was wondering if this would be a good recipe to use with a red velvet cake? If I make about 8 batches and freeze it for a month will it need a lot of mixing before using it? And do you know how long I should give it to thaw?

    Like

    Reply
    • My rule with frosting is to make it right before using it. It seems to get grainy over time in the freezer, which no amount of beating can fix, and it’s so much smoother and fluffier when fresh. Instead, I freeze the cakes, wrapped well in plastic wrap, and then frost them still frozen. It really doesn’t take too long to make the frosting, about an hour for a large batch as you’re describing, but the cakes do take time and it’s nice to have them frozen and ready to go.

      Like

      Reply
  33. Veronica, I’m doing a wedding cake with cream cheese frosting and can’t figure out what your water bottle smoothing process is…can you give me more information on how this works?

    Like

    Reply
    • I’ll have to check and see if my link to my video is still working, but basically I just have a squirt bottle that I use for water only. I got it from Walmart in the travel supplies section for $1. I squirt water all over the frosted cake, and it helps the spatula to glide over the surface and make it perfectly smooth without catching on the frosting and pulling it up. I love this trick!

      Like

      Reply
  34. What a wnderful site, you answered so many questions I have been wanting answers on. I am about to do a 3 tiered wedding cake, 14,10 & 6. Each layer will have 3 layers, red velvet, chocolate & vanilla. I want to cover it with cream cheese frosting and then with fondant. If I ice and cover the cakes in fondant a day before the wedding and then trasport them individually and assemble on at the location will they be fine?

    Like

    Reply
    • That is the exact size cake in my photos – I always did 14,10 & 6 inch tiers for wedding cakes. I never did more than two layers, though, that will be beautiful! Yes, they will be fine if you do it that way. Good luck!

      Like

      Reply
  35. One more question, I am in South Africa and we have a number of different cream cheese options. Some are decidedly more stiff than others. Does this make a difference and does it have to be a full fat creamed cheese or can it be low fat. I am worried about the stability of my cake (see my message a few moments ago). I am terrified it will slide with all the layers. Any advice would be welcome. :-)

    Like

    Reply
    • Please use full fat cream cheese, as using another kind isn’t worth the risk of having too-wet frosting. Plus, this is celebration cake, it’s supposed to be full of fat, right? :D I would go with the stiffest cream cheese you have available there. I wish I could think of something to compare the consistency of the one I use to. At room temperature, it’s much firmer than room-temp butter, but soft compared to refrigerated butter. It’s thicker than smooth peanut butter. I hope that helps. You want your frosting as firm as possible when using it for wedding cake to make sure that it supports the layers of cake well and doesn’t squish out in between. I would love to see photos of your cake afterwards!

      Like

      Reply
  36. Hi Veronica- Thanks for all of your cake and frosting insights!
    I am baking a three tiered wedding cake in a few weeks and was looking for a good cream cheese frosting that holds up well… your recipe sounds like it would work great!!
    I was just wondering if you soften the cream cheese and butter before you mix them together? Also, how many cups of icing does your recipe make? Thanks!

    Like

    Reply
    • I never realized I didn’t specify the cream cheese and butter needed to be at room temperature until you commented! Thank you for bringing that to my attention, I have fixed it. I’m not sure how many cups it makes, I have never measured, but for the three tiered cakes I used to make (14″, 10″, and 6″) I would make 7 batches of this recipe and I believe I had enough for decorating as well. If not, I definitely had enough for filling and frosting.

      Like

      Reply
  37. I used this cream cheese frosting on my Son’s wedding cake recently and it was divine. The trick is to use sufficient icing sugar so that the consistency is firm enough. Mine literally varied from day to day depending on the weather. I covered my cakes with fondant and had no problem with sliding BUT had to adjust the mixture just before icing as the weather had warmed up significantly and the icing softened too much. Keep loads of icing sugar on hand.

    Like

    Reply
  38. FYI; to achieve a level cake – when you remove the cake from the oven, use a moist towel laid on the cake in the pan and gently press the cake all over and remove the towel and cool as usual

    Like

    Reply
  39. Thank you for the tips. I am going to try a crusting cream cheese icing on red velvet for a wedding cake on Valentine’s Day. Do you also use the same cream cheese icing for decorating? I’m concerned about the cream cheese holding up to decorations without “wilting”. I’m doing a layer of tight swirls, a layer of some icing with polka dots and repeat. Are your decorations in the picture with your cream cheese icing? I notice they are a little different in color and thought you might have used a regular cake decorator’s buttercream instead for the scrolls? Thank you for your input!

    Like

    Reply
  40. Nice information, except for the suggestion to use boxed cake mixes. No box mix, even with additions, can ever equal a scratch-baked cake. A wedding cake should be “just right”, so don’t take shortcuts!

    Like

    Reply
  41. Love this post! This might be a difficult one but do you know where you can get creme bouquet in Europe or UK?! I can’t find it anywhere and people don’t seem to know what it is!

    Like

    Reply
    • I have found that Princess Cake & Cookie bakery emuslion from Lorann Oils is pretty close, though not exactly the same. Still good and will work. I hope you can find a place that sells it there. I know it’s available online.

      Like

      Reply
  42. How much coverage do you get with this recipe for cream cheese icing? I am looking to decorate a 3 tier cake.

    Like

    Reply
    • One recipe covers a two layer 8 or 9″ cake. According to my recollection (it’s been a few years) I needed 7 batches (which also gave extra for decorating) when doing a 3 tier cake with 14″ on the bottom, 10″ in middle, and 6″ on top. Hope this helps.

      Like

      Reply
  43. Pingback: Can U Freeze Wedding Cake - Get Recipe Gallery

  44. Pingback: How To Freeze Your Wedding Cake In 4 Simple Steps - Get Recipe Gallery

  45. I did read through all of the comments and responses, so very helpful. Maybe I missed it, but did not seem to see a comment specifically addressing the possibility of the safety of leaving cream cheese frosting out during the actual event. I am making red velvet cupcakes with cream cheese frosting for a bridal shower Friday night. Because I am a bit of a nervous sort regarding bacteria etc, I will absolutely be refrigerating until transport to the event. My concern is regarding getting them set up on the cupcake table prior to start time, maybe by about an hour or so, and then the sitting out time during the shower. I wonder if the frosting could go bad in this time frame?

    Like

    Reply
    • No, it will not. Truth be told, I’ve left cream cheese frosting out for a month by accident (a covered bowl was hidden in a corner) and it was still good! I was amazed. Sugar acts as an amazing preservative. I’ve left cakes with it on them out for days and they are OK. Don’t let the cream cheese scare you!

      Like

      Reply
  46. I am making a 5 tier 6,8,10, 12,14 inch cakes to be all covered and 3 being filled with cream cheese, about how much cream cheese do I need to buy, and powdered sugar?

    Like

    Reply
  47. Alycia lacombe

    Hi, does this frosting hold well under fondant? I want to make the cake a week before the wedding, so if I frost it, and put fondant on it, will it hold better if I freeze it, or refrigerate it? Thank you!

    Like

    Reply
  48. Thank you so much for sharing those essential banking tips. You tackled all my baking challenges. I can’t stand the regular cake icing, it’s too sweet and flat, while the cream cheese icing brings the fun back in icing.

    Like

    Reply
  49. Hi, I have to do a quilting technique on a wedding cake and they want cream cheese frosting. Can this be done?

    Like

    Reply
  50. Hi Veronica! Any 6″ cake recipe to share pls!

    Like

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: